Breakthrough Blog

Building a Transformation Strategy that Achieves Your Company Vision

By Dr. Dean Anderson October 17, 2017
Usually when leaders think about transformational change, they separate the hard, tangible aspects of the changes required, from the human or cultural aspects. The initial activity in a business transformation is usually oriented to the organizational changes that are going to drive business results. Leaders will focus on the new organizational structure or systems, business processes, or technology and try to, as quickly as possible, identify the design solutions for those changes. Then, once they have designed the solution, they will engage change management professionals or other organizational development professionals to help lower any resistance in the stakeholders and create commitment to the changes.
 

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Possibility Thinking: A Required Catalyst for Achieving Breakthrough

By Dr. Dean Anderson October 9, 2017

Achieving breakthrough requires possibility thinking. Possibility thinking is when we open our perspective to entertain new possibilities that have previously been beyond our worldview, expectation, experience, or comprehension. The challenge is that most peoples minds dont think in this way without conscious intention. If we are not conscious of our mindset, our minds have the unconscious tendency to engage in probability thinking that limits our perspective. This keeps new possibilities from ever emerging. 

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The Post-Visioning, Get Real Conversation

By Dr. Dean Anderson September 26, 2017

If you ask any CEO or senior executive of an organization if they have a company vision, they will say yes. If you ask most employees if their company has a vision, they will also say yes. In this day and age, everyone has a vision, but most are little more than posters on a wall.   

When you go a level deeper and ask, Is your organization actively pursuing your vision? Is it alive in people’s minds daily as they make decisions? Is it the priority-setting benchmark for resource allocation?”, both leaders and those in the workforce hesitate, often responding, “No”. 

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